Here is Monday's look at the week's transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events.

News Roundup:

  • The House Republican Conference Rules for the 112th Congress are now posted online. (GOP.gov)
  • Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin advocated for changes to the Senate rules Sunday, including ending secret holds and creating ownership for filibusters. (Roll Call $)
  • Public.Resource.Org will begin providing in a weekly release of the Report of Current Opinions, called RECOP, which will be an open source html of all slip and final opinions of the appellate and supreme courts of the 50 states and the federal government. It will be publicly available without restriction. (O'Reilly Radar)
  • Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid set aside funds in the short-term continuing resolution to allow severalcounties in Nevada and other states to receive royalties from geothermal development projects. (Roll Call $)
  • Earmarks are likely to be a topic for hot debate during the 2012 elections. (The Hill)
  • Vice President Biden said that President Obama isnt likely to veto a Congressional spending measure for including earmarks. (Roll Call $)
  • Chairman Issa makes changes to the Oversight committee to pursue more targeted oversight of recent government activities, including establishing new subcommittees to look at homeland security, regulation and stimulus, and financial services and bailouts. (Politico)
  • ForeignAssistance.gov, a new government website, was launched late last week to track federal money being spent abroad. (Tech President)
  • The Senate Armed Services Committee prohibits its staff and presidential appointees requiring Senate confirmation from owning stocks or bonds in 48,096 companies that have Defense Department contracts, but the senators who sit on the panel are allowed to own any assets they want. (Washington Post)
  • Despite a 1933 constitutional amendment that attempted to ban lame duck sessions, modern Congresses have not only held these sessions, but have also used them to tackle some of their biggest votes. (Washington Post)
  • Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor interviews former Justice John Paul Stevens about the evolution of the Court and of the law. (Newsweek)
  • Lobbyists are saying that they have seen a recent change in President Obama's attitudes towards K St. and the business interests it represents. (The Hill)